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If you’re not doing it, thinking about it, or trying to get it (if not some combination of the three), then there must be something wrong with you, right? Lackluster libido isn’t reserved for the menopausal – roughly 30 percent of women experience problems with low sex drive, and college women aren’t immune.

The truth is, there is a myriad of factors that affect your sex drive: stress, hormonal fluctuations, and losing that “spark” in a long-term relationship are just a few of the common culprits.

If you’ve ever noticed yourself craving sex more during certain parts of your cycle, that’s your hormones at work – so if you’re experiencing a chronic lack of desire, a hormonal imbalance could be to blame.

Many women complain of decreased desire while on hormonal birth control (especially the Pill).

Whenever we were around each other, I was happy and comfortable, but I didn't feel horny.” Sarah’s not alone, but she recognizes that her lack of sex drive has started to affect her relationship and her happiness.

“This feeling has continued for a couple of years,” she says.

I'm 21; I feel like I shouldn't feel this way until I'm 40.” : Psychological Causes But don’t be fooled: while it’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that sexual desire is a purely physical reaction, physical causes only scratch the surface of all the factors that affect a woman’s sex drive.

“Sexuality is a unique process because it is both emotional and psychological, as well as physical,” says Jeffrey Sumber, psychotherapist, author and teacher.

“Prior to this, I was always in the mood when my boyfriend was around. The summer that I got on the Pill, we would be seeing each other constantly, but compared to summers past, there was far less sex.

I am considering getting an IUD, but I know that it can be painful to insert, and it is also expensive.

But at this point, it would be great if I could get some of my sex drive back.

According to womentowomen.com, “The body interprets ongoing stress as life threatening, so naturally, survival is prioritized ahead of pleasure.

Stress over-burdens the adrenal glands, ‘stealing’ the substances normally used to make estrogens and testosterone, both vital to desire and sexual response.” Hormonal changes could also be the problem.

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